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to pyongyang. press articles hail the fact that china in anticipation of the recent launch had begun inspecting cargo on north korean ships in search of contraband. the question this raises is why has chi gnat not been inspecting north korean ships since 2006 as called for in a u.n. resolution, reinforced by another resolution in 2009. if u.n. member states would only enforce the sanctions currently on the books, north korea would be unable to ignore the swer national community and the civilized world. the time for coordinated international action is now. the time, in fact, is long overdue. with that, mr. speakering i reserve the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the squom from florida reserves. the gentleman from california, mr. berman is recognized. mr. berman: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in strong support of h.con.res. 145 as amended and yield myself such time as i may consume. sproy the gentleman is recognized. mr. berman: i would like to thank the sponsor of this legislation, ms. ros-lehtinen, for her leadership on this issue and her work in addressing the north korean threa
a satellite into orbit. its neighbors are unnerved. even china expressed regret at the move. the obama administration condemned it as a provocative act and will likely ask the u.n. security council to impose crippling sanctions. the pentagon following developments this morning. chris lawrence there. what do you know, chris? >> right now, officials say that object that north korea put into orbit, monitoring it, analyzing it, but they confirm it is in orbit. why is that important? the same technology you would use to put into orbit is the same technology you use to develop long-range ballistic missiles, the u.s. condemned this act. they are worried about the marriage of north korea's nuclear weapons with this long-range missile technology. this is the type of missile that if it was successful, as it appears to be, could reach parts of the united states, alaska, u.s. military bases in hawaii. but a u.s. efficiently i spoke with who used to work on north north korea for the defense department told me, there are still areas in which north korea has not made it as far as they would need to i
constitution and the history of the rule of law. this interview was part of a discussion on china opposed the legal system hosted by the brookings institution. china's >> ok. concepts. for 20 years i have been advising -- roughly half of that on financial economic matters. the other half a variety of topics. about 10 years ago, we started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when paul worked at the state department and bill clinton was president, this topic in my view has never gotten the attention it deserves. it has been treated too much as a technical topic. not as a fundamental topic about the relations of the states. in my experience, i always say the chinese leadership, the most distinctive characteristic is they are systematically opened. that is to say the modus operandi is on a particular topic, let's look for the best ideas throughout the world, bring them back, study them, and then customize them as appropriate for our own system. and yet in this one respect, they have
is unacceptable. the people's republic of china, which is not exactly a beacon of hope for those looking for religious liberty. we all know the situation in tibet which is not just a religious issue, it's an ethnic issue, a cultural issue. we see the self-emolation of folks willing to burn alive because it's so intolerable what they're going through and the effort of that government to wipe out their identity. but it goes much deeper than that. proselytizing governments, nonpatriotic catholics. understand that the chinese government authorizes the catholic church, who the leadership of that church can be. truly unique in all the world you have a government that tells you who your bishops are, who tells you who gets to run your church. if you worship outside of that setting, you're persecuted. there are others, the tibetan beautists i mentioned before but -- buddhists that i talked before. but it's not just religious believers who are facing persecution in china. this is from the report, the chinese government continues to harass, detain, intimidate, disbar and forcibly disappear, forcibl
not create any jobs. as far as china is concerned we do not hit that high of a tariff on their imports. i believe it is a lot higher. the whole thing was steve jobs. he treated the apple computer in his garage. when he got successful theme of his company over to china giving chinese people jobs. if steve jobs was born in china he would not even be able to create the apple computer. we just do not do enough for the people of this country. the people who are position to create jobs do not reinvest in the country. i do not think they should get tax breaks. if you want to give these corporate giant tax breaks given to those who want to invest in the country and create jobs. for a lower than the american businessmen. guest: i understand your frustration. part of it is the corporate tax .ode clearly needs to fix it a lot talk about fixing a and a revenue neutral way. it does not help lowering future deficits any easier. there are some things need to change. in general we need to realize that if we set our country on the bike path making the right investments in -- the right path making investme
working actively in china to buy european- american-chinese goods. the government is not completed, but they're not doing enough. we're thinking that pressure needs to be brought on china. goods made in germany, sold by that company to the chinese company that thinks it will keep it in china, but in fact it is going to iran. all it a country of tr concern. we're thinking maybe it is time that china is called out on that. china needs to be pressured to stop a local in the system internationally that is being created to keep iran from outfitting its centrifuge program. that effort over time has had tremendous success. with more and more sanctions, it is been more successful. more purchases stopped, more interdiction's, more trouble for iran to make progress. >> in terms of u.s. non- proliferation programs, david is emphasizing some of the holes that exist, particularly in controls and lack of enforcement of existing sanctions legislation. what is your assessment of non- proliferation programs? >> when you hear discussions on sanctions, these are the things we tried to do to cut off s
to america at 14, 15, $16 an hour. we don't celebrate that. i'm glad they're here instead of china, but heck. if we had an economy that would support $30-an-hour jobs, i'd be for that. better than a ceo. you know, destroying a company and then getting a $200 million payout. but that said, what is wrong with a state allowing an american to work where he or she wants to work without having to be compelled to pay union dues? >> well, this state, michigan, was such a part of the core of unionism in this country, the foundation of the united automobile workers which at one point had over 1 million workers in its enrollment is now down to roughly maybe 350,000 workers. the united automobile workers, everybody can own a car in america. the history of unionism has been inextricably linked to the growth of the middle class, as you know, over the last 60 years of american history. the right-to-work legislation that has passed now in 24 states, i don't think you can dem demonstrably prove that it leads to higher wages, that it leads to marginally -- >> but what's wrong with giving people the freedom to
of bermuda. >> reporter: they can take it to singapore or china. it doesn't to come back to america. there is no law which says if you make money overseas it must come back here. megyn: now they are getting upset overseas. the french tax authority removed computer files in italy. the tax police searched the come numbers milan offices. they say they don't believe they are paying their fair share of tax. that may or may not be true. but if it's legal how much can they do? >> reporter: it's perfectly legal. they investigated various companies and put pressure object them from a public relations standpoint. starbucks, for example, they weren't forced to hand over money but they were pressured into making a special payment of $10 million pounds, $16 million to the british chancellor of the exchequer. they did it for good p.r. maybe something similar will happen with google. they don't have to pay. they have done perfectly legal stuff. megyn: he reportedly turned down being treasury secretary, or the new secretary of business. he says it's called capitalism. we are proud to be capitalisti
-night phone pals. he would call him and sometimes it was as other presidents had to talk to nixon and china and russia and the leadership and their motives, but sometimes it was just to talk about how to organize his day. clinton would run through his way dey with nixon, this is when i'm waking up, eating, organizi organizing, is this how you did it? who else can you talk to about that? >> the book is "the presidents club." >> a great, great club. >> thank you to doris and john as well. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again.
vacuum cleaner. thus providing exporters -- germany, japan, or china -- with the requisite demand necessary. so, the ever expanding trade deficit was not an accident. it was a very clever way of replacing one that surplus recycling system with another. it was one where america had a surplus and america decided instead of doing what germany is doing at the moment -- which is cutting its nose to spite its face, and thereby ending the recession by cutting, cutting, -- entering into recession because they are imposing austerity on themselves, cutting -- volcker as the head of the fed at a different idea. we are going to expand our dominance and are well by expanding our deficit and using our deficits to provide the rest of the world with the demand which is necessary to grow their economies, even at the expense of hours. and who is going to pay for the deficit? if i have an ever-expanding deficit, the bank tells me it is came over. but if you are the united states of america and there are certain other factors that i will touch upon later, what you can do is you can expand your defici
is an america needs offshoring. we have to offshore barack obama. he has to go. send him to china. >> first of all, what is . >> a vegas odds makers is someone who predistincts the winner of a sporting event. it was a natural outgrowth for me. to predicting the winner of political elections. and i think it was 2004, news max, the conservative website said out of all the odds makers and pollsters in america the one who got the most accurate prediction was wayne root. i predicted bush by three points and 35 electoral votes and he won by three votes and. i'm darn good. are you breaking these political odds down by county? >> i just look at people. i'm a people person. the same reason i've been predicting sporting event. i'm good at who has the edge based on situation historical or situational situations based on whether players are up or down. psychologically based on how they played last week and next week. i felt the same way about election. i know, four years ago i spoke to probably 1,000 i was a vice president nominee hundreds of small business people. i would say normally you think of sma
point of view was gorbachev also wanted to improve relations with china and japan. with 100 inf missiles directed at them how has he going to do that? it was not in their interests to have 100 missiles out of europe and it was really in their interests. we now have access and have for some years to records of politburo discussions and let me go back to a couple words about president reagan. before he first met gorbachev, he rode out on the yellow pad several pages without prompting from anybody what he wanted to achieve at geneva in his first meeting. mcfarland handed this to me as we regretting it off of the plane to go to geneva saying this is what the president had on his mind. if he is wrong we will straighten him out. it was a very perceptive paper and among other things he pointed out that the biggest problems, one of these was lack of trust. that he had to find a way to begin to create trust. we are not going to solve anything else. he also added, if i don't achieve anything else, i must convince gorbachev that we don't want an arms race. if he wants one he is going to lose it. an
to pay toward china and the middle east will not let him. there was a successful sabotaging program against iran's nuclear program and a ery new approach of iran's central bank and other institutions that continues to enrich uranium. is kind of're seeing the twilight of america's cold war imperium in the middle east. the u.s. will have a relationship with the new egypt but it will not be the relationship of a client state that we saw with's the minority -- hosni mubarak or on war said sadat. is the changing relationship in the country like pakistan after the osama bin laden raid and in states like yemen. they look over the horizon that bahrain and say, we do not want that. host: one of the papers this morning has a story taking a look at the change in leadership in specific countries in asia and highlighting what is going on in north korea, south korea, and japan. what does that prove for the administration? guest: you can put north korea in the same category as japan and south korea. they have taken power and have produced leaders but are still checked by the open society and by th
to do? you going to borrow it from china? alisyn: i mean, you know, nancy pelosi's taken a lot of heat for that famous saying, you have to pass the bill to figure out what's in the bill. but now that seems haunting, because the fact that even senators now are saying, whoa, whoa, whoa, slow down, we want some of these things repealed. >> 17 democrats in the senate including senator-elect elizabeth warren from massachusetts. 17 democrats in the senate with three weeks to go before this tax is imposed suddenly realize this is going to cost a lot of money, it's going to hurt my voter, it's going to hurt the device industry. please delay it. all of a sudden. alisyn: maybe they should have read it. >> but it was very long. alisyn: it was long. [laughter] you've got that right. stu varney, thanks so much for parsing all of this. >>> meanwhile, a violent political power struggle on the streets of one major u.s. ally, but as both sides protest in egypt, there's also a push to legitimize some hard-line islamist groups. so in three minutes we'll check in for a live report from the heart of the cr
as in china we went and helped people in small businesses that have been wiped out temporarily to be able to come back, our fishing people deserve emergency assistance to tide them over and help them through this most critical time. i would turn to the senator from alaska and the senator from new hampshire, and ask what that means to the state of new hampshire if she might share with us. mrs. shaheen: my friend from massachusetts understands the challenges we have in new hampshire, as does senator whitehouse from rhode island, because, in fact, fishing is one of the oldest industries that we have in new england. and new hampshire it dates back over 400 years. because we have a much smaller coastline than massachusetts and rhode island, we have a smaller -- smaller group of people who earn their living through fishing, but they have smaller boats, and therefore they're more affected by some of the fishing regulations and some of the adverse weather conditions that have affected fishing. about 90% of the fishing that new hampshire's fishermen do is for cod and cod is the species that has be
come here from haiti, somalia, china, mexico, in calista's case her grandparents came from switzerland and poland, in my case they came from places like scotland and ireland. you can come from anywhere, and you can learn to be an american. but to do that, the you have to learn to be an american. and if you have an academic elite and a news media elite and an entertainment elite who are opposed to teaching you how to be american, you cut off the life blood of this country. that's why we have an american legacy tour. now, several people said when they found out i was coming out here that if i'm going to come out here and talk about george washington, which to a lot of people seems a long way off, and i talk about sweet land of liberty and land of pilgrim's pride, both of callista's books have become bestsellers, it's actually about the 13 controlnies. her mother, who's now 80, wrote her and said you should not say this is for 4-8 years old, this is for 4-80 years old because nobody has studied the colonies and, therefore, it's brand new information for everybody. somebody said to me, oka
relations with china and japan. and with 100 i.n.f. missiles directed at them how was he going to do that? it was not in their interests to have 100 missiles out of europe. and it was really in their interest. now we've access of records of politburo discussions. let me go back to a couple of words about president reagan. before he first met gorbachev, he wrote out on a yellow pad several pages, without any prompting from anybody, what he wanted to achieve at geneva in his first meeting. bud mcfarland handed me this as we were getting on the plane to go to geneva saying there is what the president has in his mind. if he is wrong somewhere we will have to straighten him out in briefings. actually, it was a very per self-active paper and among -- pe perce perceptive. one of them was a lack of trust or we were not going to some anything else. added if i don't achieve anything else, i must convince gorbachev that though we don't want an arms race, if he wants one he is going to lose it. and, number three, whatever we achieve, we must not call it victory. because that will simply make any furt
at this hour's hot shots. wisconsin, a cnn ireporter takes a picture of snow-covered trees. >>> in china, christmas tr ornaments are on display. in florida, packages are shipped on what they expect to be the busiest day of the year. and in japan, monkeys cuddle together in the snow. hot shots, pictures from around the world. >> those monkeys in japan, not the only monkeys in the news today. jeanne moos has proof that nothing perks up a hum drum shopping day like a monkey in a fancy coat. >> you go to ikea expecting cheap furniture. >> this is so bizarre. why is there a monkey at ikea. >> there he was running around in an outfit that freaked everyone out. >> it's faux fur, not a shearli shearling. >> double breasted, no less. the tweets started to fly. anyone lose their monkey at ikea? actually, yeah. the owner was shopping inside the store when monkey managed to get out of his crate and then out of the car. >> all the people were trying to, like, call it towards them, but it was very scared. it was darting all over the place. they were trying to get it away from cars. >> his diaper only
to -- of china chance is progress to if there was one district name in changing the health and when people said the but the time from cover to,. it was a two session time. what they really meant was that they scanned it things they have read a yesterday. it was the reliable place to go. all of the news fit to print. it was a very important -- it was a very important part of history. let's take the normandy invasion in 1944, a major historic event. you remember -- most of us do not remember that, but if you think of that, could he should the map of the allies' progress? at the end of the thirties. horace. the crimes a point of departure, to make sure they have full reporters, that the most accurate news was really in the newspaper. the great news reporters could do so much. so it really was not the place for people to go to the news. i want to stress something else out. at that time, the government and the media were aligned. there was not this junction that we have now. it was not fox fees. there was not a gap that will come to later. i wanted to become the new media and administration was clos
about how china is taking over. what we need to make some decisions that is going to help the america people, corporate america, middle-class america, those individuals that are not in the capacity whatever so ever, i expect our elected officials to getting together, work this thing out, do the right thing, quit the fighting and come up with a solution even if they have to go back after the fact and just get things the way they are supposed to be. >> some of the expectations there from willard. we're going to go on to cal on the republicans line in tennessee. what do you think of the fiscal cliff and where the negotiations are so far? >> i think they ought to go over the fiscal cliff. we have people like that that are on the government bill too long. they are sucking the tit of the federal government. i think everyone should pay their fair share. we have almost a $17 billion national debt. not only, the rich but everyone should pay their fair share. we also need some spending cuts too. $3 for every $1. if you don't do this we're going top find ourselfs in a situation -- you want to ta
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